Dr. Frederick Cox Becomes Army’s Newest Senior Executive

CCDC Chemical Biological Center Public Affairs | July 26th, 2019

Dr. Frederick J. Cox, Ph.D. receives his official Senior Executive Service pin from CCDC Chemical Biological Center Director, Eric L. Moore, Ph.D. Photo by Shawn Nesaw.

Dr. Frederick J. Cox, Ph.D. receives his official Senior Executive Service pin from CCDC Chemical Biological Center Director, Eric L. Moore, Ph.D. Photo by Shawn Nesaw.

Dr. Frederick J. Cox, Ph.D. officially took the reins of leadership as the Combat Capabilities Development Command (CCDC) Chemical Biological Center Director of Research and Technology at a July 22, ceremony in Edgewood that made official his promotion to the Senior Executive Service (SES) Corps.

CCDC Chemical Biological Center’s Director Eric L. Moore, Ph.D., officiated the proceedings and delivered remarks highlighting Cox’s contributions to the Center and Cox’s temperament and focus on people that has earned him his new position, and the respect of employees at all levels of the chain of command. In his remarks, Moore shared that Cox distinguished himself not only with his dedication to the organization and its mission, but also to its people.

“Rick always had a strategic vision,” Moore said. “He has a sharp scientific mind and scientific acumen, but he also develops relationships with people.”

Beginning his career in chemical and biological defense as a contractor supporting projects for the Department of Homeland Security and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cox found himself supporting the overall chemical and biological defense mission of the United States.

Cox transitioned to a federal civilian employee in 2009 when he became the Center’s Chemical Biological Radiological Filtration Branch chief. After dedicated service supporting his team, he was promoted to Chemical and Biological Protection and Decontamination Division chief.

Col. Thomas Saltysiak, the Center’s military deputy, served as Master of Ceremonies for the pinning ceremony, during which Cox received his official SES pin and accompanying certificate, as well as the official SES flag. Moore administered the oath of office, as Dr. Cox’s wife, Dr. Joy Ginter Cox, also a CCDC Chemical Biological Center scientist, held the Bible on which her husband pledged his loyalty to the organization and the tenants of service.

Following the official proceedings, Cox took the podium to thank his family, friends and colleagues who gathered for the occasion, and to focus attention on the criticality of the Center’s mission. He mentioned the support role the CCDC Chemical Biological Center played during the chemical warfare agent poisoning in Salisbury, England, in 2018 and how Center employees would be called to action in the event a similar attack occur in the United States.

“Don’t forget the magnitude of your everyday work,” Cox advised. “I know many feel that no one is paying attention when you, yourself, are toiling in the lab, but our adversaries are. We are a deterrent to them to prevent their actions.”

Cox also praised the camaraderie of the Center workforce.

“We are a great team. We have each other’s backs and lift each other up,” he said.

While the focus of the celebration, Dr. Cox made sure to share credit with his fellow Chemical Biological Center team, deflecting his own accomplishments and encouraging his co-workers to take advantage of the many opportunities that present themselves during a long career. Moore’s remarks concluded with a quote from the Taoist philosopher Lao Tzu that he said summed up Cox’s leadership style.

“A leader is best when people barely know he exists,” he said, “when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves.”

The Senior Executive Service was established in 1978 to be a corps of executives to serve in key governmental positions not filled by top presidential appointees. It is the highest civilian service in the government and is extended only to those federal employees who demonstrate professional integrity, a broad perspective, and a commitment to the highest ideals of public service. The SES Corps is comprised more than 7,000 members. The Department of Defense employs approximately 460 members of the SES, who are accorded general officer status.

Cox, with wife Joy Ginter Cox and Director Moore, takes the Oath of Office. Photo by Shawn Nesaw. Cox, with wife Joy Ginter Cox and Director Moore, takes the Oath of Office. Photo by Shawn Nesaw.

The U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Chemical Biological Center (CCDC Chemical Biological Center) is the Army’s principal research and development center for chemical and biological defense technology, engineering and field operations. The Center has achieved major technological advances for the warfighter and for our national defense, with a long and distinguished history of providing the armed forces with quality systems and outstanding customer service. The CCDC Chemical Biological Center is located at the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.